AGEIR demonstrator #8835 became the plant switcher for Ingersoll-Rand while the normal kinks one might expect from this prototype locomotive were attended to. The General Electric logo was applied to the rounded end of this unit and INGERSOLL-RAND and an ALCO logo were overlayed on the sides of the body. Demonstration service began June 9, 1924 with the New York Central RR and were concluded at the Alan Wood Steel Company July 11, 1925. The following is a list of the many rail operations that participated in this trial program along with some associated events...


Viewed from inside #8835 looking out through the panoramic window arrangement of #1 end.
Note the fold-down seat providing a view of the controls attached to the sandbox...

New York Central RR - June 9, 1924 to August 23, 1924...
Placed in Yard Switching Service (NYC West Side yards) on July 19th for a daily recording of performance data....
In a Yard Switching Test this unit was operated 24 hours per day (almost continuously) handling 3 shifts daily from July 24th to August 7th. Inspections could only occur during crew changes...
On August 14th a "Tonnage Test" was conducted. #8835 pulled "93 loaded freight cars on level track" for 36 minutes. Note: The Ingersoll-Rand record does not indicate what these loads consisted of...

Baltimore & Ohio RR - August 25, 1924 to September 4, 1924...
A Local Freight Service test was conducted on August 29th to record performance data...

Central RR of New Jersey - September 5, 1924 to September 9, 1924
A Light Yard Drilling test was conducted during this period to record performance data...

Demonstration unit #8835 was returned to Ingersoll-Rand on September 12th for a complete inspection. Measurements were taken of various parts and compared with the first full inspection record of February 12th 1924. Wear was so insignificant that it doesn't bear mentioning here. After the wrist pin, crank pin, and main bearings were set up to standard clearances the engine was closed exactly as it was taken apart and returned to service. No parts needed replacing...

New York, New Haven & Hartford RR - September 22, 1924 to November 4, 1924...
Yard Switching Service tests were conducted during this period to record performance data...

Union Freight RR - November 6, 1924 to November 8, 1924...
40 hours of testing in the Boston Massachusetts area...

Boston & Maine RR - November 10, 1924 to November 20, 1924...
132 hours of various testing operations were conducted by this railroad...

Long Island RR - November 28, 1924 to February 16, 1925...
Yard Switching Service tests were conducted till December 7th to record performance data. Then a second period of demonstration trials was begun in which it is reported that an additional 234 hours of testing was concluded on February 16th 1925...

After leaving the Long Island RR #8835 went to Bethlehem Steel Company where it was tested for 9 hours on the Philadelphia Bethlehem & New England RR of Pennsylvania...

The Bethlehem Steel demonstration was followed by a Passenger Service Test during February 27-28th 1925. Two passenger coaches were pulled by #8835 between Jersey City New Jersey and Harrisburg Pennsylvania in a little over 11 hours to record performance data...

Reading Railroad Company - February 27 (?), 1925 to March 17, 1925...
Demonstrator #8835 was received at the end of February 1925 and beginning on March 4th participated in Yard Switching Service tests to record performance...

Delaware Lackawanna & Western RR - March 23, 1925 to March 28, 1925...
Yard Switching Service tests were conducted to record performance...

Hoboken Manufacturers (Shore) RR - March 31, 1925 to April 2, 1925...
26 hours of various testing operations were conducted by this railroad...

Sometime after the Hoboken Shore RR trials were completed the demonstrator unit went to the New Jersey Zinc Company of Palmerton Pennsylvania where it was tested for 79 hours on the Chestnut Ridge Railway...

Alan Wood Steel Company of Conshohocken Pennsylvania... July 9, 1925 to July 11, 1925...
Steel Plant Yard Service tests were conducted to record performance data in conjunction with the Upper Merion & Plymouth RR...


Early into the demonstration trials it became apparent that the economic gains, reliability, and timing of prototype #8835 combined to create an acceptance of the Diesel-electric as a practical means of motive power. The success of these demonstrations prompted General Electric to design two versions of a Diesel-electric locomotive that would be entered into production. A 60 ton unit utilizing one 300 horsepower Ingersoll-Rand engine and a 100 ton unit rated at 600 horsepower derived from two of the Ingersoll-Rand Diesel power plants. Drawing on the engineering of straight-electric Freight Motor car bodies the Box Cab design was agreed upon for both versions. ALCO then issued Order # S1484 for three mechanical assemblies of the GE 60 ton design and Order # S1494 for one GE 100 ton model. These Orders were issued for "Stock", but it was generally agreed that the units would be sold upon completion. By mid April 1925 Ingersoll-Rand had their first diesel engine ready for installation (only demonstrator #8835 had its power plant installed at Ingersoll-Rand and all production Diesel engines were shipped to the General Electric Erie Works for installation). In early June 1925 the first AGEIR 60 ton 300 horsepower Box Cab Diesel-electric locomotive was operating on the East Erie Test Track. It was initially designated demonstrator #9681, but was actually the first production Diesel-electric unit produced in North America...



The author of this AGEIR study was John Campbell, who developed the web pages, and who died in 2005. These pages are dedicated to his memory and to his tireless research. Comments and questions on this AGEIR material should be directed to the C&NWHS, which has assumed the responsibility for this information.